Low-Resolution Digital Certification Pak Now Available

The Open Water Diver Digital Certification Pak – Offline (English), product #60460-1, has been enhanced to accommodate users with limited internet connectivity. This independent study pak comes with two download options: 1) the PADI Open Water Diver Touch, a single large file with integrated videos, and 2) a digital PADI Open Water Diver Manual, which has embedded quizzes and exams in addition to the Knowledge Reviews that can be stored and uploaded whenever the user connects to the internet. Student divers continue to have access to digital versions of the Recreational Dive Planner (RDP) table and eRDPML. The PADI Open Water Diver Video is also now available separately from the high resolution Touch version, and can be downloaded in six separate low-resolution files (including the Introduction and five sections).

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Student divers have the option to download either version of the Digital Certification Pak – Offline training materials based on their connectivity and device storage capacity. Because the file size of the separate videos and manual is smaller, the files download quickly even with a slow internet connection. In addition, users can download the files individually or all at once, offering even more flexibility when accessing training materials.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What are the main differences between the two versions of this product?
A:
The Open Water Diver Touch, which contains integrated high-resolution videos, must be downloaded as one file, which is best achieved with a fast internet connection. The smaller, separate-file option is comprised of the Open Water Diver Manual file and the six compressed Open Water Diver Video files. Student divers may download one video at a time or all six at once (internet bandwidth/time allowing).

Q: How does a student diver purchase this product?
A:
After registering for the Open Water Diver Digital Certification Pak – Offline and logging in to the PADI Library App, new and existing student divers have access to both versions, and  see these 12 folios::

  • Start Hereinstructions on how to begin
  • PADI Open Water Diver Touch (high-resolution file)
  • PADI Open Water Diver Manual
  • PADI Open Water Diver Video – Introduction (low-resolution file)
  • PADI Open Water Diver Video – Section 1 (low-resolution file)
  • PADI Open Water Diver Video – Section 2 (low-resolution file)
  • PADI Open Water Diver Video – Section 3 (low-resolution file)
  • PADI Open Water Diver Video – Section 4 (low-resolution file)
  • PADI Open Water Diver Video – Section 5 (low-resolution file)
  • eRDPML (digital version)
  • RDP Table metric (digital version)
  • RDP Table metric (digital version)

Q: Are there instructions explaining how to access the manual and low-resolution videos?
A:
Yes. The second confirmation email sent to student divers, which includes instructions on accessing the product, also includes information regarding the two options. The Start Here folio provides simple step-by-step instructions on how to begin. In addition, at the beginning of the digital manual there is also information regarding the option of streaming or downloading video files.

Q: Can a student start one version of this product (high- or low-resolution version) and switch between the versions without losing any work?
A:
Yes, but once a version is selected, it’s recommended the student remain with the initial choice throughout training. However, the Knowledge Reviews, Quizzes and Exam scores will carry over to the eRecord as long as the student completed and submitted the results.

Q: How soon will this low-resolution option be available in other languages?
A:
Expect to see rollout of translated materials in several languages in third quarter 2017.

How to Buy & Use PADI eLearning or Touch Codes 

1st Quarter 2017 Undersea Journal Now Available Via PADI Library App

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Every quarter of The Undersea Journal is filled with stories and articles that help you stay informed and inspired as a PADI® Professional. In addition to choosing a printed magazine, there are several digital reading options for this publication:

1. Using the PADI Library App (Apple App Store | Google Play):
From your mobile device, open the Library in your PADI Library App, download and view.
On your computer, select Certification Paks from the Log In tab at the top of padi.com. From there you’ll be able to view the magazine in the Online Manuals portal.

2. Via the Zinio app on your computer or mobile device.

3. As a PDF on the PADI Pros’ Site. Log on to the Pros’ Site and click on the References tab. You can download the entire magazine or choose to download it in sections.

Each quarter, the latest edition of the publication will be added to the PADI Library App.

If you’re a digital subscriber, you’ll continue to receive an email notification that your publication is available for viewing on Zinio. If you’ve opted for the printed version, it will continue to be delivered to your mailing address.

The Millennials are coming!

Article written by John Kinsella

You can either run for cover or step up and take notice, but no matter what you do, the odds are that the majority of your dive business will be done with Millennials in the not too distant future. Born between 1980 and 2000, the Millennials are poised to become diving’s largest emerging market, especially for the dive industry and we have exactly what they’re looking for.

PADI University Program Channel Islands Shoot March 24-29, 2007

You have to be careful when you start applying sweeping assumptions to large groups of people. Every time I’ve researched “Millennials” I’ve come up against myth and discrepancy. “They all live at home sponging off their parents.” Not so apparently, the majority (nearly 60 percent) have their own homes (and don’t forget that many of them are still in their teens!).

But there are a few significant consistencies. Two of these should have PADI Pros paying attention: Millennials are concerned about their careers. They are receptive to becoming dive professionals and earning a living while doing something that they love. This generation appreciates how the PADI System is structured with recognition for each step they take.

When talking about diving to Millennials, it’s easy for PADI pros to highlight how each course builds towards a professional qualification. It’s simply a matter of taking the time to point out how the PADI System builds, seamlessly, from entry level right through to Divemaster and beyond. Make sure that these people know that earning a professional/vocational qualification is an extremely realistic goal and not a burdensome long-term project: The course they’re enjoying right now is part of that process (and may well qualify for college university credit). All they need to is take well-defined steps and enjoy the rewards and recognition they earn along the way.

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Millennials are also likely to warm to PADI’s commitment to connected learning and social media. Millennials don’t just use social media – it’s an integrated part of their life. Mobile responsive websites and active communication via social media are mandatory. Instagram is a big one with this group, as well as Facebook and YouTube. These are not just ways to interact, fully 88 percent of Millennials get at least some news from Facebook according to the American Press Institute. Again PADI Pros, literally, have it made. From EVE to My PADI Club to learning in the cloud, there’s a PADI solution ready and waiting.

Take a look at the article on Emerging Markets in the 1st quarter The Undersea Journal for more detail on the Millennials (and some other significant emerging markets) and what some of your peers are doing to make sure that diving is at the top of their list.

How to Perfect Your Dive Briefings

Article by John Kinsella

“I’d have given you a shorter briefing, but I didn’t have the time”
Comprehensive, to the point, dive briefings take focused effort.

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Sometimes little things pack a big punch. Consider the ubiquitous dive briefing. This common, short, presentation has a huge influence on a dive’s outcome and, especially in light of the Risk Management article in the 1st quarter 2017 The Undersea Journal, it’s a good idea to make sure that dive briefings get looked at, critiqued, and improved regularly.

The legal case mentioned in the UJ article hinged on a dive guide’s failure to include information on potential environmental conditions. Not mentioning the existence of these inherent, potential environmental conditions became a key factor in the court’s decision: The guide received the majority of the fault; in spite of the fact that the diver signed a release and made a simple procedural error.

So what do you include in a brief? A good start is a review the Divemaster materials, particularly the slates. There are 10 points to cover:

1 – Dive site name
2 – Site description
3 – Your role
4 – Entry and exit techniques
5 – Dive procedures
6 – Emergency procedures
7 – Signal review
8 – Roster and buddy check
9 – Environmental orientation
10 – Predive safety check

Some of these are simple and self-explanatory, others are a bit more involved and overlap. For example, under site description, make sure to cover topography, points of interest, hazards, conditions, depth, compass headings, facilities, emergency equipment, etc. Without dwelling on the negative, cover hazards and conditions thoroughly. If, say, there are tidal currents at a particular site, mention them (and how to avoid or deal with them) even if you’re diving at slack water.

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Some of these will blend in with dive procedures, especially if there are recommended procedures for dealing with specific local hazards or environmental conditions. Under dive procedures cover such topics as suggested course, how to avoid any problems that may occur due to site hazards and conditions, safety stops, air reserves, group control, etc. Many of these will vary from site to site.

Emergency procedures should deal with local protocols, separation, low on or out-of-air, diver recall procedures, surface signaling devices, and so on. Again, there’s no need for exhaustive scare mongering, but it’s vital to be comprehensive.

How do you get all this into a nice tight brief? Ironically, it takes some time to eliminate unnecessary technicality, jargon and detail, which is the surest way to kill a brief.

A great start is write this information down for each dive site you visit, not only so you have something in hand to make sure you don’t forget anything, but also because the process of writing it down is a great way to focus thinking and make sure nothing is forgotten. And there’s no better way to gather input from staff or clients than to hand them a copy of the briefing and welcome their feedback.

Brevity, relevance and impact matter hugely: take the time and make the effort to achieve them.

First PADI Freediver Instructor Training Course in the United States

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Break out the champagne!

What a groundbreaking week for the PADI Freediver Program! This past week, three Freediver Instructor Candidates successfully completed the first PADI Freediver Instructor Training Course in the United States. This PADI “first” was instructed by PADI Ambassadiver™ and Freediver Instructor Trainer Forrest Simon of Go Native Freediving in Williston, Florida, home of the world-famous Devil’s Den and Blue Grotto fresh-water springs. The candidates included two South Florida watermen, Roy Ferreira and Willy Yuque, as well as recently spotlighted PADI Divemaster, 66-year-old John Harkins from Huntsville, Alabama. John’s completion of the PADI Freediver Instructor Course culminates the incredible first leg of his freediver journey which begun less than a year ago.

The four-day course consisted of skill building and knowledge development workshops that focused on instructional development, technique proficiency, and PADI Standards and Procedures, all designed to arm the Instructor candidates with the ability to teach the physical and mental skillset needed by every single one of their future PADI Freediver students.

Congratulations to Forrest and PADI’s newest Freediver Professionals, Roy, Willy and John, who are integral to establishing a safe, competent and credible PADI Freediver community.

My PADI Club Benefits for PADI Members

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In the last My PADI Club blog article, you read about the new My PADI Club coming in 2017 and how it offers tools, expert advice and a community of like-minded divers to make it easier for people to explore, learn, and share their passion for diving.

But, My PADI Club is also packed with benefits for PADI Members. Here are just a few:

  • Earn Commissions for every new diver you enroll in My PADI Club.
  • Strengthen Customer Relationships by following customer journeys and staying connected as they use tools like the Dive Logbook, Buddy Finder and Go Dive! Alerts.
  • Extensive Discounts offered to My PADI Club divers make it easier for you to sell more gear, book more repair and maintenance, and complete more certifications.
  • Free Promotion by using the My PADI Club platform to promote events, find new customers and drive more business through your door.
  • Personalized Go Dive! Alerts let you know when it’s time to get in the water so you never miss an opportunity to share a great dive with your customers.
  • Free Unlimited Access to the My PADI Club platform as part of your PADI membership.

To learn more, contact your PADI Regional Manager or Training Consultant and stay tuned to hear more about My PADI Club.

PADI Pros Facebook Pages New Global Structure

The PADI Pros Facebook Pages are important platforms for PADI to communicate important news, updates and tips relating to PADI and the industry specific to your region.

These Facebook Pages will soon be merging into a new global page structure.

What does this mean for me?

You will most likely not notice any difference; however, you will be defaulted to the regional page based on the country where you live. You will have the option to switch regional pages by selecting a different country.

How do I switch regional pages?

  • Hover over 3 dots on the right of the Message button ‘…’ below the Page’s cover photo.
  • Select Switch Region.
  • Select the country you want as your default for the Page.
  • Click Save Preference.

Example from facebook.com/PADIProsNorthAmericaCaribbean

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What will the global page structure look like?

There will be a new global PADI Pros Facebook page and then the same regional pages that you have already been following.

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What PADI Pros Facebook pages are currently available?

PADI Pros
PADI Pros Africa
PADI Pros East Asia
PADI Pros Europe
PADI Pros Japan
PADI Pros Latin America
PADI Pros Middle East
PADI Pros North America & Caribbean
PADI Pros Oceania
PADI Pros South East Asia
PADI Pros South Korea

We strongly encourage you to visit and ‘Like’ the PADI Pros Facebook Page relative to your region.

If you have any questions about this transition, please contact PADI’s social media team at socialmedia@padi.com.