Take Part in the Fourth Annual PADI Women’s Dive Day on Saturday 21 July 2018

For the past three years, divers from every corner of the globe have come together for PADI® Women’s Dive Day to bond over their love of the ocean and a passion for diving. This growing tradition will continue on 21 July 2018, further strengthening and supporting the female dive community through a day of fun, adventure and camaraderie.

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PADI Dive Centers and Resorts hosted more than 884 events in 85 countries last year for the third annual PADI Women’s Dive Day on 15 July 2017. Since the 2015 inaugural event, the celebration has continued to gain momentum as new and experienced divers gear up for everything from high tea on the high seas to shark dives and underwater cleanups. As a result, PADI female certifications increased noticeably increased noticeably year over year.

This was possible thanks to the enthusiasm and participation from PADI Members around the world who got behind this initiative. Let’s do it again, only bigger. More new divers. More ambassadors for the underwater world.

Participate in PADI Women’s Dive Day 2018 to strengthen and grow the female dive community, attract new women to the sports of scuba diving and freediving, and motivate existing female divers to get back in the water and continue their dive training.



Start planning your 2018 PADI Women’s Dive Day event on 21 July 2018 using these simple steps. 

  1. Decide what type of event to host. The type of event to host is completely up to you! Whether you conduct PADI Women’s Dive Day themed courses, have a family-oriented open day, host fun dives or even a girls’ night out with your divers, only your imagination limits your event.
  2. PADI Retail and Resort Members, register your event on the PADI Women’s Dive Day Event Locator. By registering your event, your dive center/resort will be included on the Event Locator at padi.com/women-dive.  To register your event, ensure you are logged into the Pros’ Site with your PADI Dive Center or Resort account (not an Individual Member account), go to ‘My Account’ page of the PADI Pros’ Site, and click on ‘Register your Women’s Dive Day event(s)’. Follow the on-screen instructions to quickly and easily add your event.
  3. PADI Professionals hosting an event not affiliated with a dive center/resort are encouraged to share their event information with their regional PADI office (PADI Americas: womendive@padi.com; PADI Asia Pacific: marketing@padi.com.au; PADI EMEA: marketing.emea@padi.com).
  4. Promote your event. Use different platforms to help get the word out about your event – email, social media, advertisements (print, online and in-store), and event calendars. Be sure to tag your social posts with #padiwomen to be part of the global conversation.
  5. Post Event Follow-Up. Follow up with all your PADI Women’s Dive Day event participants afterward. A simple “thanks for being with us” keeps divers engaged and encourages them to continue diving with you. Don’t forget to include links, telephone and a call to action. And be sure your success stories and photos with the marketing team at your PADI Regional Headquarters! Tag event photos that you post on social media with #padiwomen to feed into PADI’s social channels.

PADI Retail and Resort Members: Register your 2018 PADI Women’s Dive Day event now! 

 

Introducing the All-New PADI Travel

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The all-new global PADI Travel™ features an online travel platform and full-service team dedicated to providing top-notch travel services – inspiring divers to explore more of the underwater world and take care of our oceans. PADI Travel is designed to energize and grow the overall diving community for the benefit of everyone in the dive industry, offering hundreds of dive destinations around the world and poised to expand over the coming months with more dive resort offerings.

With each dive operator’s unique business model in mind, PADI Travel is available to augment, support or enhance a PADI Dive Center’s current travel program. Catering to groups and individual travelers alike, PADI Travel combines the best of online booking with concierge-level travel consultancy, offering:

  • The highest customer satisfaction with expert customer support 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • One of the largest online selections of liveaboards and dive destinations in the market.
  • Dedicated dive travel experts with in-depth dive knowledge and experience to provide personalized advice; the team averages 2,500 dives per customer service representative, with dive experience spanning a total of 80 countries around the world.
  • Eco-friendly trip options to help people dive with a purpose.

PADI Travel launches as a leading online travel provider for divers, offering a user-friendly experience to research, compare and book dive vacations anywhere in the world. In today’s digital world, travelers have high expectations with respect to their ability to find information and book online. The new travel platform is made possible by integrating tried-and-tested technology and a global team of dive travel experts from Diviac, a startup dive travel company that has been successfully operating in the online scuba travel space since 2015.

There are many ways that PADI Members can benefit from PADI Travel, including:

  • Liveaboards and PADI Resorts can tap into new customer sources, increase bookings and reduce administration.
  • PADI Dive Centers can get assistance organizing and marketing group trips, earn travel agent commissions on trips booked for their customers with PADI Travel, or earn affiliate commissions for divers referred to PADI Travel.
  • PADI Professionals can earn valuable incentives for divers referred to PADI Travel.
  • PADI Dive Centers will be able to receive direct online bookings for their day trips and PADI courses (COMING SOON!).

For those in North America who have worked with PADI Travel Network, be assured that PADI continues to enjoy a positive relationship with PADI Travel Network’s service provider, Caradonna Adventures, and will work with them throughout 2018 to ensure needs are met. Dive centers are encouraged to work with Caradonna Adventures for land-based travel needs until more dive resorts are added to the PADI Travel offerings.

Explore travel.padi.com to discover all that PADI Travel offers to the dive community.

To learn more about joining the PADI Travel affiliate program, visit travel.padi.com/affiliates. If you’re interested in listing your dive resort on PADI Travel, please contact sales.travel@padi.com. To get support in organizing group trips contact travel@padi.com.

PT-FAQ

BVI Dive Operators Eternally Optimistic in Light of Recent Hurricane Activity.

Written by Mike Rowe, President BVI Dive Operators Association

“When you have vision it affects your attitude. Your attitude is optimistic rather than pessimistic.”– Charles R. Swindoll

“We are open for business” is a mantra that we have now been professing for some time in spite of the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Irma and Maria in September. The BVI Dive Operators (BVISO) encourage our loyal dive community, to support the local businesses and re-visit our marine playgrounds. Come see for yourselves how the forces of nature have (subtly) reconfigured our wrecks and reshaped the underwater environment, now offering exciting new opportunities for exploration and adventure.

Our Dive Operators have been compiling information over the past weeks/months, and reports coming in are reassuringly positive.

Abi at Blue Water Divers recently commented, “While we see some damage on some of the sites, the marine life is still out there waiting for us. This week we have seen Eagle Rays, Turtles, Reef Shark, lots of Lobsters, Crabs and a Leopard Worm, and so much more.”

While some of our most popular sites, The Indians, Dead Chest, Ginger Steps, have experienced little to no change there has been a “shifting” effect on our most visited wrecks.

Our most famous wreck, the RMS Rhone, has been very comfortable in her setting for the past 150 years; she has entertained and enthralled thousands of divers over the decades. Although the bow section no longer offers a safe swim through from one end to the other, rest assured she will continue to be our most valuable underwater resource and now has new features to offer! Come re-explore a truly remarkable wreck site.

The Beata in Wreck Alley has also offered up an interesting addition. She has decided to sit a little closer to the reef (very convenient) and has shed her exhaust stack and placed it nicely at the stern in the sand as a fish attraction device.

The airplane wreck at Great Dog must have finally found its wings because it has taken off.  An honorable mention from the dive operators for the first guest that locates the fuselage!

Our most recent addition to the BVI wreck collection, the Kodiak Queen, has lost some of the Kraken’s mesh coating; however she remained stable in her location and has become a very popular site for a myriad of marine life.

The Chikuzen, remains one of our most requested wrecks, always a plus when environmental conditions allow us to visit her.  She has changed her shape a little and exposed new structures.

As always, and especially at this time, the BVI Dive Operators are recommending that all divers exhibit good buoyancy control around our reefs and wrecks. We ask, and recommend strongly, that guests resist the urge to penetrate a wreck unless guided by a local dive professional. As all divers do, reefs and wrecks need a little time adjust to their new environment.

We look forward to welcoming you (back) to the British Virgin Islands.

PADI Application Fees & eLearning Prices for 2018

2018 application fees

Below are some helpful links to use throughout the year. Bookmark them for quick reference in 2018.

2018 PADI® Application Fees
How much is the PADI Master Scuba Diver™ processing fee? What is the application fee for a new PADI Divemaster? Find this information and more by bookmarking this link to PADI Application Fees.

PADI eLearning® and Touch Retail Pricing for 2018
Quickly find the retail price for PADI eLearning and digital products like the Open Water Touch certification pak here: PADI eLearning and Touch pricing.

Member, and PADI RRA Member pricing is available in the 2018 PADI price list. The price list is not available for download. Please contact your PADI Americas Regional Training Consultant along with your PADI member number to have a PDF version of the price list emailed to you.

PADI 2018 IE calendar (pros site login required)
To view the most up-to-date version of PADI Americas’ IE schedule for 2018, log into the PADI Pros Site, then click the link below to go directly to the 2018 PADI IE dates.
https://www2.padi.com/mypadi/templates/cb-login.aspx?id=6963

When can I download the 2018 PADI Instructor Manual?
The 2018 Instructor manual is scheduled to be posted to the Pro’s Site the first week of February 2018. Renewed PADI Pros can login to the Pro’s Site and download the manual from the Training Essentials menu.

Where can I download the 2018 PADI Price List?
You can view current pricing by logging into the PADI Pros Site and clicking the red Shop Online button. The online shopping cart has been updated to reflect current pricing. For a copy of the PADI Americas’ price list as a PDF, please contact your Regional Training Consultant and include your member number. Currently, the price list is not available for download.

Customer Service and PADI Standards

The PADI® Quality Management program’s primary objective is to ensure that all PADI Members understand the importance of using PADI’s educational system and are aware of their responsibility to adhere to PADI Standards. When members deviate from standards, the program acts to get members back on track. When members demonstrate excellent service and are complimented by their student divers, they receive recognition for their work.

There are times, however, when complaints come in that are more about customer service issues than clear violations of PADI Standards. The PADI Quality Management team won’t tell PADI Members how to run their businesses, but will get involved when a member’s practices fall within the parameters of PADI Standards, specifically the PADI Member Code of Practice (found in the first section of your PADI Instructor Manual).

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Here’s a review of a few common customer service complaints that cross over into standards issues, along with tips to help you avoid disappointing your customers and hearing from the Quality Management team:

1. Customers express concern and frustration when planned dives are changed at the last minute to very different sites than what was initially advertised. For example, the dive is scheduled for a shallow reef and en route the boat captain tells customers they’re going to a deep site with more challenging conditions because one buddy team, or worse, a crew member, requested it.

  • Divers who are prepared and comfortable doing a shallow reef dive may not be ready for a deep, challenging dive.
  • In the Member Code of Practice, you are required to comply with the intent of safe diving practices, consider individual comfort levels and err on the side of safety. Changing to a more challenging site does not uphold these practices.
  • If you must change sites, make an effort to choose alternate sites with dive profiles and features similar to the initially planned dives.

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2. Another common complaint from student divers and certified divers is concern about the equipment provided to them. For example, divers describe extremely tight-fitting BCDs or exposure protection that restrict breathing. Wet suits that are too large are also problematic because being cold may increase decompression sickness risk. Then, there is the marginally working low-pressure inflator or the leaky alternate air source.

  • PADI Members have an obligation to put diver safety first, providing a student diver or novice ill-fitting equipment, or worse, equipment that isn’t functioning properly is inconsistent with this obligation.
  • Proper maintenance is paramount to diver safety, customer satisfaction and risk management. It’s also important that maintenance records be maintained and the maintenance schedule is consistent with any existing procedures or manufacturer recommendations.
  • Enhance your customer service by asking customer if they’re familiar with and comfortable using the provided equipment. Showing your concern for the diver’s safety and enjoyment is prudent and a good business practice.

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3. Customer refunds are a common customer service issue. For example, a customer complains that a “three-week” Rescue Diver course is only partially complete after three months due to continuous rescheduling on the instructor’s part. The customer asks for a referral and the instructor refuses without explanation.

  • PADI Standards require you to issue a referral if the student diver completed at least one segment of the course and has met agreed-upon financial arrangements.
  • After a quality management inquiry, the dive center that employs the instructor determines it’s appropriate to not only provide the referral, but also a refund for the course. However, the dive center never provides a refund to the diver.
  • Alerted that the dive center did not meet its commitment, the quality management inquiry is reopened due to the member’s lack of common honesty and professional obligation to the customer and PADI.
  • Again, PADI Members determine business policies, such as when to provide refunds. However, if you make a commitment to a customer, you need to fulfill that commitment.

The best way to avoid customer service and quality management issues, it to apply good judgment when providing dive services and to be diligent about maintaining professional business practices. Occasionally, take a moment to reread the PADI Member Code of Practice and make sure you abide by all requirements.

Stopping the Sting

Written by DAN staff

Marine life stings are an uncommon, but unfortunate reality of exploring the underwater world. No matter how hard you try, you can’t entirely eliminate the risk of marine life stings for yourself or your student divers. Know how to reduce risk, treat injuries, and keep your students more sting-free and happily diving this year.

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Jellyfish

The name “jellyfish” refers to an enormous number of marine animals belonging to the phylum Cnidarian. While some species, like the Box Jellyfish, can cause life-threatening health complications with their venom, the majority of jellyfish encountered by divers are significantly less lethal. Jellyfish stings typically range from painless, imperceptive numbness, to burning reactions with mild to moderate blistering.

Student divers may be too excited and task-focused on their first dives to keep an eye out for jellyfish, so exposure protection is important. Have students use dive skins, wetsuits or dry suits as appropriate to protect their skin. In locations where the jellyfish populations are prominent, it’s possible to be stung by almost invisible strands or tentacle pieces carried in the current. Exposure suits are the best bet for injury prevention in these areas.

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If stung, irrigate the area with generous amounts of vinegar to prevent further envenomation, remove any visible tentacles with tweezers or protective barriers, and wash the area with a seawater or saline solution. Irrigating with freshwater can cause further envenomation. Using painkillers, anti-inflammatory medications, or topical anesthetics can help remedy discomfort, as can immersing the area in hot water or icing the injury for 30 to 90 minutes.

Life threatening reactions are rare, but possible, and are characterized by severe pain, nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, muscle spasms, low blood pressure, dysrhythmias, and cardiovascular failure. Follow emergency care procedures and quickly get the patient to professional medical care in these cases.

Fire Coral

Fire coral are colonial marine cnidarians that can envenomate humans through direct skin contact and cause burning skin reactions. The coral often appears yellow-green or brownish and frequently has branchy formations, although this can vary based on its environment. Divers can prevent injury by avoiding fire coral contact or by using exposure protection, such as dive skins or gloves.

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Fire coral injuries typically present as a burning sensation that can last several hours, followed by a rash that may last for several days. The rash will often subside after a day or two, only to reappear several days or weeks later. Treat fire coral injuries by rinsing the affected area with vinegar and keeping the area clean, dry, and aerated. Redness and blisters will likely develop. Allow the injury to heal on its own, do not further irrigate the area or puncture the blisters.

Fire coral injuries are rarely serious, but can complicate open wounds and result in tissue death, so be sure to seek qualified medical attention if you or a student has a rash in the area of an open wound.

For more information on marine life injuries, visit DAN.org/Health

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Member Forum 2018 Online Coming Soon

There’s no need to wait for a Member Forum to come to your area. You can get the latest and greatest information from the 2018 Member Forum Online that will be available on the PADI® Pros’ Site in February – in English and Spanish.

Member Forum 2018 covers:

  • We Are PADI – a Force for Good
  • What’s New with PADI Digital Products
  • My PADI ClubTM Features
  • Project AWARE® – Where Conservation Meets Adventure
  • How to Use New Digital Forms
  • The New PADI Adaptive Techniques Specialty
  • Risk Management – Scenario Reviews

Stay tuned for more information coming later this month and watch for a schedule of limited dates for in-person Member Forums.